Table Top: Part 2

Once I got it downstairs I set about doing a dry run to makes sure everything was going to glue ok. There no second chance once the glue is applied. Luckily everything did and I clamped it up and left it over night. 

Table blank showing the mortice and tenons

Table blank showing the mortice and tenons

Some large clamps I borrowed off the boys at my old  job  

Some large clamps I borrowed off the boys at my old job 

The roundish table top

The roundish table top

Once I'd roughly cut the top out with a jigsaw to a 54cm radius I set out to give it a decent flatten. It had a slight crown in the middle of the top surface and corresponding cup on the underside. I wasn't looking for perfection, after all it's somewhere to eat dinner and not a reference surface. You can't plane with the grain as the surface doesn't have one grain orientation but instead you have to go 90 degrees to it. A sharp jack plane did a very good job of this and after a couple hours I had it flat and thicknessed.  

Router trammel jig and the mess I made.  

Router trammel jig and the mess I made.  

I made a trammel jig to hold my 1/4" router and set the radius to 53cm and slowly worked my way round the table. The router isn't big enough nor powerful enough for this job but I got I done eventually. The underside was given a 45 degree chamfer and the top a round over. 

My favourite job of sanding.  :(

My favourite job of sanding.  :(

The new sander.  Bosch GEX 125-150 AVE   

The new sander. Bosch GEX 125-150 AVE  

I have a Makita 1/4 sheet sander but it's not really up to the job for something this size. I decided to splash out on a new random orbit sander. This one can use both 125 & 150mm discs. I can't believe how quiet and vibration free it is. A couple of hours was all it took to get it sanded up to 240 grit.  

Would I lay down my life to save my brother? No, but I would to save two brothers or eight cousins.
— John B. S. Haldane